Transmission of Viruses from Sweetpotatoes and Wild Species of Convolvulaceae in East Africa: Many Gaps to Fill

TitleTransmission of Viruses from Sweetpotatoes and Wild Species of Convolvulaceae in East Africa: Many Gaps to Fill
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsTugume, AK, Mukasa, SB, Valkonen, JPT
JournalVector-Mediated Transmission of Plant Pathogens
Pagination447-452
ISBN Number978-0-89054-535-5
KeywordsFuture Studies, Limited Knowledge of Virus Transmission in Sweetpotato, Main Viruses Infecting Sweetpotatoes in East Africa
Abstract

Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (family Convolvulaceae), ranks as the world’s third most important root crop after potato and cassava. The global annual production of sweetpotato is approximately 128 million tons on 8 million hectares, of which over 90% is in developing countries. In countries surrounding the Lake Victoria basin of East Africa, the crop is essential mostly as a “famine reserve” crop. Its suitability for piece-meal harvesting, high performance in marginal soils, adaptability to abiotic stresses such as drought, resistance to most pests and diseases, and high content of vitamin A in orange-fleshed cultivars make it an ideal staple crop in subsistence economies. However, processed products, biscuits, and other fashionable foods made of the orange-fleshed sweetpotato are also entering markets and elevate the status of sweetpotato among local consumers.

URLhttp://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/9780890545355.033
DOI10.1094/9780890545355.033